Journal of Poetry Therapy

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 63–77 | Cite as

Finding Our Way Home: Poetry Therapy in a Supportive Single Room Occupancy Residence

  • Mari Alschuler
Article
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Abstract

This paper discusses a poetry therapy group held at a supportive single room occupancy residence (SRO) in East Harlem, New York City. The SRO houses formerly homeless, mentally ill adults. The group has been helpful in reaching clients in ways in which medication and psychotherapy have not been able. This paper describes the SRO, the group members, techniques and work produced by members, and issues of social integration, separation and clienthood as special difficulties of psychiatric ally impaired people and addresses ways in which poetry therapy can be useful in developing and fostering peer support, mastery and achievement among its members.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mari Alschuler
    • 1
  1. 1.New YorkUSA

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