Journal of Poetry Therapy

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 221–230 | Cite as

Poetry and Feminist Social Work

  • Kris Kissman
Article
  • 1 Downloads

Abstract

This paper explores how the use of poetry can be included in feminist social work as a method of empowerment and consciousness raising among women. Poetry and other literary writings by women serve as examples of the common experiences of subgroups of women who are connected by a unifying voice through literature.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kris Kissman
    • 1
  1. 1.the School of Social WorkUniversity of MichiganUSA

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