Journal of Poetry Therapy

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 207–220 | Cite as

Processing Possible Selves in Possible Worlds Through Poetry

  • Marguerite Nelson Creskey
Article
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Abstract

This article is a report of a special project on the use of poetry to enhance self-understanding with learning disabled students (ages 6–12). The purpose of the project was to utilize poetry to provide exposure to achievement imagery and practice in expressing self-determination. The reading, discussing and writing of poetry was consistent with the progression of steps leading to self-determined behavior.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marguerite Nelson Creskey
    • 1
  1. 1.Clarkstown Central SchoolWest NyackUSA

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