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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 42, Issue 4, pp 154–179 | Cite as

A Pledge of Peace: Evidence of the Cochise-Howard Treaty Campsite

  • Dem J. Seymour
  • George Robertson
Article

Abstract

Historical maps, documents, and photographs have been combined with archaeological data to confirm the location of the cochise-Howard treaty camp. Brigadier General Oliver Otis Howard, his escorts Lieutenant Joseph Alton sladen and Thomas Jonathan Jeffords, and the chiricahua Apache chief cochise met in the foothills of the Dragoon Mountains of southern Arizona in October 1872 to negotiate the surrender and relocation of this “most troublesome Apache group” (Bailey 1999:17). Warfare between the Apache and the Americans had been ongoing for more than a decade. This meeting culminated in a peace treaty between Cochise’s Chokonen band and the United States government. Photographs of unique boulder formations confirm the treaty-negotiation location, and written landscape descriptions provide further verification. Wickiup rings, other feature types, and artifacts provide archaeological confirmation regarding the nature and spatial layout of the camp and clarify the vagaries of the historical record.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dem J. Seymour
    • 1
  • George Robertson
    • 2
  1. 1.AlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.PearceUSA

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