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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 20–37 | Cite as

Using Geodatabases to Generate “Living Documents” for Archaeology: A Case Study from the Otago Goldfields, New Zealand

  • Edward González-Tennant
Article

Abstract

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are still growing in relation to historical archaeology, and the related literature contains little on the actual methods for structuring such data. The author draws on fieldwork at four sites in the Otago Region of New Zealand to present a sample data model as well as various uses for GIS in historical archaeology—from initial data collection to public presentation. Methodology developed here was used to map surface remains with GPS at four gold mining sites. Because unforeseen problems can arise when transitioning field data into digital formats, the process developed as part of the author’s work to translate, organize, and disseminate data is presented in clear steps. The benefits for public consumption of archaeological material is discussed as well as the potential for GIS to address simple phenemonelogical questions about past decisions in regards to site placement.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward González-Tennant
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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