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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 28–48 | Cite as

Early Pastoral Landscapes and Culture Contact in Central Australia

  • Alistair Paterson
Article

Abstract

The arrival of British pastoralists throughout central Australia from the 1850s marked the introduction of wool production, predominantly for industrialized Britain. Pastoral industries were both capitalist and colonizing enterprises. Archaeological research and historical documents from pastoral station managers reveal how indigenous people were involved in the workings of Strangways Springs Station in northern South Australia (1860–1900). Research reveals differential Aboriginal involvement in the pastoral industry, indicated by two phases in the development of the pastoral station. Changes in pastoral work practice over time influenced cultural interaction.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alistair Paterson
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for ArchaeologyUniversity of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia

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