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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 105–135 | Cite as

Social Flux at the Naval Establishment at Penetanguishene, Lake Huron, 1817–1834

  • John R. Triggs
Article

Abstract

Factors influencing the spatial arrangement of buildings at the Royal Navy establishment at Penetanguishene on Lake Huron are discussed. Excavation at the naval hospital at this site provides new insight into the residential movements of the various social groups at the base. Analysis of stratigraphy and artifacts recovered from the hospital suggests that the assistant naval surgeon and his wife, military officers, and aboriginal people resided in the structure at various times over a 17-year period. Contemporary attitudes toward social and economic status, service rank/rating, and aboriginal people are explored within the context of the archaeological and documentary evidence to explain changes in residential patterning through time.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Triggs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Archaeology and Classical StudiesWilfrid Laurier UniversityWest WaterlooCanada

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