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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp 121–134 | Cite as

San Diego Presidio: A Vanished Military Community of Upper California

  • Jack S. Williams
Article

Abstract

Popular views of San Diego Presidio portray it as a fortified community, inhabited largely by Spanish soldiers, who followed customs that were predominantly European. Ongoing documentary and archaeological research suggest that these views represent an inaccurate picture of the settlement and its people. For more than a third of its years of existence (1769-1835), the presidio was not protected by any fortifications. Throughout its history, the population of the base included large numbers of civilians. The people of the presidio represented a racially mixed community. The way of life that they pursued included elements that drew heavily on local Native American, and Mesoamerican, cultural roots.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack S. Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Spanish Colonial ResearchSan DiegoUSA

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