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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 129–149 | Cite as

Myth, migration, and material culture: Archaeology and the ulster influence on appalachia

  • Audrey J. Horning
Article

Abstract

Studies of the material record of the southern mountains, in conjunction with documentary research and judicious use of oral history, have the potential to fundamentally alter the manner in which the regional cultures and identities of Appalachia have traditionally been studied and, in so doing, to decrease the marginalization of the region through addressing the complexity of its past. A National Park Service-sponsored archaeological project centering on three mountain hollows in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, focused upon identifying and analyzing the physical traces of 18th- through 20th-century settlement in a region long portrayed as the last refuge of hardy Scotch-Irish pioneers. Information from this study is used to test the model of Scotch-Irish cultural dominance in Appalachia, with a reevaluation of the nature of the 18th-century migration from the north of Ireland and a critical consideration of the linkages between ethnicity and material expression.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audrey J. Horning
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Archaeology and PalaeoecologyThe Queen’s University of BelfastBelfastUK

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