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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 3–15 | Cite as

Interdisciplinary approaches to the meanings and uses of material goods in Lower Town Harpers Ferry

  • Paul A. Shackel
Article
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Abstract

Recent archaeological excavations performed by the National Park Service at Harpers Ferry have contributed significantly toward understanding domestic life during both the 19th-century armory period and subsequent commercial development of the town. Many studies have focused on technical industrial development of cities, although few studies have highlighted the effects of industrialization on everyday life. An interdisciplinary approach provides insight into issues related to health, hygiene, diet, consumer behavior, landscape, and gender relations.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul A. Shackel
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of ArcheologyHarpers Ferry National Historical ParkHarpers FerryUSA

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