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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 1–23 | Cite as

The influence of trade on Bahamian slave culture

  • Paul Farnsworth
Article

Abstract

The Bahamian plantations of Wade’s Green and Promised Land are compared using analyses of ceramics, tobacco pipes, and beads. The differences in the distributions revealed are explained by each plantation’s market access. The research is significant because it illustrates conditions where economic models commonly used to interpret archaeological data are mediated by local conditions. Distance and isolation from the point of distribution restricted access to goods and accentuated the planter’s control over the goods available to the slaves in the Bahamas.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Farnsworth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geography and AnthropologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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