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Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 233–236 | Cite as

Abnormal thyroid stimulating hormone following pituitary surgery

  • G. K. Worth
  • R. W. Retallack
  • D. H. Gutteridge
Short Communication

Abstract

Biologically inactive thyroidstimulating hormone (TSH) has been reported in hypothyroid patients. We report the first case of immunoreactive, but abnormal TSH in a euthyroid patient following hypophysectomy for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma. Indirect evidence indicates that this abnormal TSH was biologically inactive. The TSH was characterized by gel chromatography and has a molecular weight of approximately 23,000 daltons.

Key-words

TSH prolactin adenoma hypophysectomy gel chromatography abnormal 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. K. Worth
    • 1
  • R. W. Retallack
    • 1
  • D. H. Gutteridge
    • 1
  1. 1.Endocrinology Unit, Sir Charles Gairdner HospitalThe Queen Elizabeth II Medical CenterNedlandsAustralia

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