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Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 29, Issue 11, pp 1001–1005 | Cite as

Cerebrospinal fluid leakage as complication of treatment with cabergoline for macroprolactinomas

  • R. T. Netea-Maier
  • E. J. van Lindert
  • H. Timmers
  • E. L. Schakenraad
  • J. A. Grotenhuis
  • A. R. Hermus
Case Report

Abstract

Treatment of patients with prolactinomas consists primarily of dopamine agonists (DA). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage has sporadically been reported in patients with macroprolactinomas treated with short-acting DA such as bromocriptine. Little is known on the incidence of this complication in patients treated with the long-acting D2 specific DA cabergoline. We report three patients with CSF leakage shortly after initiation of cabergoline treatment for macroprolactinoma. All three patients responded rapidly to cabergoline (CAB) by shrinkage of the tumor and release of the optic chiasm compression. The CSF leakage occurred within 10 days after initiation of treatment. CAB treatment was not discontinued. In one patient the CSF leakage ceased spontaneously, with no additional therapy. The second patient had a surgical repair of the CSF fistula, permitting cabergoline to be continued without a recurrence of the CSF leakage. The third patient refused surgical repair of the sellar defect. In this patient the cabergoline dosage was temporarily decreased with no effect on the CSF leakage. Four years later, the CSF leakage is unchanged in this patient, whilst no other complications occurred during the follow-up. No infectious complications occurred in these three patients. In conclusion, patients with large, invasive macroprolactinomas are at risk of CSF leakage during medical treatment with CAB. It is advisable to warn these patients for occurrence of this complication and to monitor them closely especially during the first months of treatment.

Key-words

Cabergoline prolactinoma cerebrospinal fluid leakage complication 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. T. Netea-Maier
    • 1
  • E. J. van Lindert
    • 2
  • H. Timmers
    • 1
  • E. L. Schakenraad
    • 1
  • J. A. Grotenhuis
    • 2
  • A. R. Hermus
    • 1
  1. 1.Pituitary Center Nijmegen, Department of EndocrinologyRadboud UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Pituitary Center Nijmegen, Department of NeurosurgeryRadboud University Nijmegen Medical CenterNijmegenThe Netherlands

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