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Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 51–54 | Cite as

Cushing’s disease and marked hyperprolactinemia in a patient with a pituitary macroadenoma: effectiveness of bromocriptine treatment

  • G. Verde
  • P. Loli
  • M. E. Berselli
  • M. Tagliaferri
  • D. Dallabonzana
  • G. Oppizzi
  • A. Liuzzi
  • P. G. Chiodini
  • G. Luccarelli
  • S. Lodrini
Case Report

Abstract

The case of a young boy bearing a pituitary PRL secreting adenoma (20–30,000 ng/ml) with the unusual association of clinical and endocrinological features of Cushing’s disease successfully treated with bromocriptine is described. Brain computed tomography evidenced a huge pituitary adenoma leading to visual field defects and raised intracranial pressure. Due to the very large size of the tumor, which rendered the complete neurosurgical removal unlikely, medical treatment with bromocriptine (10 mg/day) was started. Follow-up for more than six months demonstrated an impressive reduction of tumor size, the lowering of prolactin levels into the normal range, the normalization of visual field, and the regression of both clinical and biochemical signs of hypercortisolism.

Key-words

pituitary adenoma tumoral hyperprolactinemia Cushing’s disease bromocriptine 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Verde
    • 1
  • P. Loli
    • 1
  • M. E. Berselli
    • 1
  • M. Tagliaferri
    • 1
  • D. Dallabonzana
    • 1
  • G. Oppizzi
    • 1
  • A. Liuzzi
    • 1
  • P. G. Chiodini
    • 1
  • G. Luccarelli
    • 2
  • S. Lodrini
    • 2
  1. 1.Divisione di EndocrinologiaOspedale NiguardaMilanoItaly
  2. 2.Istituto Neurologico C. BestaMilanoItaly

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