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Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 197–201 | Cite as

Thyrotropin receptor autoantibody measurement following radiometabolic treatment of hyperthyroidism: Comparison between different methods

  • A. Chiappori
  • D. Villalta
  • I. Bossert
  • E. M. Ceresola
  • D. Lanaro
  • M. Schiavo
  • M. Bagnasco
  • G. Pesce
Comment

Abstract

Background: TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Graves’ disease (GD). The use of human recombinant TSH-receptor far improved the analytical performance of TRAb assays (2nd-generation assays). The 3rd-generation assay is based on the inhibition of binding of a human biotin-labeled monoclonal thyroid-stimulating antibody (M22) to TSH-receptor by the autoantibodies present in the serum. Aim: We aimed to assess the ability of the 2nd- and 3rd-generation assays to detect serum TRAb following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. Methods: Sera from 47 hyperthyroid (25 autoimmune, 22 non-autoimmune) patients were tested using the two different assays before and at different time intervals after radioiodine therapy. The modifications of TRAb were evaluated, as well as the correlation between the two methods. Results: The results obtained by the two methods proved to be closely correlated. A rise in TRAb was invariably observed in GD patients following radioiodine, with a median peak at 6 months, irrespective of their initial clinical status, presence of ophthalmopathy, smoking habits or other variables. Such a rise was nearly superimposable using both methods. No TRAb appearance was observed in patients with non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism. Conclusions: The use of methods of higher sensitivity with respect to that formerly used indicate that nearly all GD patients develop TRAb following radioiodine, and that this phenomenon is transient and not related to baseline conditions and clinical outcome/efficacy of treatment.

Keywords

Graves’ disease hyperthyroidism radioiodine therapy thyroid autoimmunity thyrotropin-receptor antibodies 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Chiappori
    • 1
  • D. Villalta
    • 2
  • I. Bossert
    • 1
  • E. M. Ceresola
    • 1
  • D. Lanaro
    • 1
  • M. Schiavo
    • 1
  • M. Bagnasco
    • 1
  • G. Pesce
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical and Radiometabolic Therapy Unit, Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of GenoaGenoaItaly
  2. 2.Allergy and Clinical Immunology UnitA.O. Santa Maria degli AngeliPordenoneItaly

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