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JOM

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 74–78 | Cite as

Prospects for Carbochlorination in Aluminum Recovery from Italian Leucitites

  • Giuseppe Bombara
  • Rocco Tanzi
Extractive & Process Metallurgy

Summary

The strategic interest in the exploitation of non-bauxite ores in Italy for aluminum production by non-conventional processes is discussed. This research has resulted from a large number of recent investigations of alternative raw materials and processes as well as an understanding of the vital importance of aluminum metal and the dependency of most developed countries on foreign sources for bauxite ores. The large Italian deposits of leucititic materials are examined in relation to various production processes. Among these processes the carbochlorination-chloride electrolysis route appears to be comparable to the conventional Bayer and Hall-Héroult processes for bauxite with regard to overall energy and materials requirement.

Much research work, however, appears to be necessary for the industrial development of a chlorinating metallurgy of general use for extractive processing of polymetallic oxide materials such as aluminous ores.

Keywords

Nepheline Light Metal Metallurgical Society Carbothermic Reduction Aluminum Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giuseppe Bombara
    • 1
  • Rocco Tanzi
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of MetallurgyUniversity of RomeRomeItaly
  2. 2.Centro Ricerche Veneto (SAMIM), Porto MargheraVeniceItaly

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