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JOM

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 40–43 | Cite as

Comparative Philosophy of Environmental Regulations

  • Judith Larsen
Extractive & Process Metallurgy
  • 6 Downloads

Summary

This paper investigates the different ways in which Sweden, Japan, and the United States have attempted to resolve problems of environmental damage caused by air pollution from industrial sources. These three countries share common problems resulting from high industrial development and also common technological and scientific resources to overcome those problems; the solutions they have chosen, however, are very different.

Keywords

Environmental Policy Pollution Abatement Comparative Philosophy Swedish Kroners Pollution Control Equipment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Commission of the European Communities, Eleventh General Report, Luxemburg, 1977.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Commission of the European Communities, Environment and the Quality of Life, First Environmental Research Programme. Luxemburg, 1978.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Environmental Policies in Japan, Paris, 1977.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Environmental Policy in Sweden, Paris, 1977.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Commission of the European Communities, State of the Environment: First Report, Brussels, 1977.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    William H. Rodgers, Environmental Law, West Publishing Company, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1977.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Larsen
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyWashington, D.C.USA

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