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JOM

, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp 50–54 | Cite as

Alumina: Calcination Control and Smelting Use

  • J. P. McGeer
  • J. Douglas Zwicker
Extractive Metallurgy
  • 18 Downloads

Summary

Specific surface area should be used as the standard method for qualifying the degree of calcination of smelter-grade alumina. It is a property which is sensitive to temperature change in the calciner. The analytical method is precise, rapid, and operator-insensitive. It is thus a practical method for use in calciner control. Furthermore, for the smelter operator it is a direct measure of the performance of the alumina in a dry-scrubbing system.

It is, however, a one number average property. Aluminas can vary in the spread of the degree of calcination and this can have significant effects on its behavior in use. Smelter operators should be aware of this fact and attempt to determine if the alumina is as uniform as they expect.

Keywords

Calcination International Standard Organization Calcination Process Rotary Kiln Refractive Index Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. McGeer
    • 1
  • J. Douglas Zwicker
    • 1
  1. 1.Alcan International Limited, Kingston LaboratoriesKingstonCanada

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