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Comparative study of attitudes to eating between male and female students in the People’s Republic of China

  • M. Makino
  • M. Hashizume
  • K. Tsuboi
  • M. Yasushi
  • L. Dennerstein
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to compare eating attitudes and lifestyles of male and female college students in China (Beijing). Subjects And Methods: The subjects of this study consisted of 217 male and 177 female college students. They were asked to fill out the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) and a lifestyle questionnaire. Results: The percentages of those above the cutoff point on the EAT-26 for abnormal eating attitudes were 4.7% of male and 6.2% of female students. Body perception of being fat (distorted body image) was the factor most associated with abnormal eating attitudes. Discussion: Weight related concern was prevalent amongst the Chinese students. This suggests that the culture of the beauty of thinness is common among young students in Beijing, particularly female students.

Key words

Abnormal eating attitudes Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) lifestyles Chinese college students gender difference 

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Copyright information

© Editrice Kurtis 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Makino
    • 3
  • M. Hashizume
    • 2
  • K. Tsuboi
    • 2
  • M. Yasushi
    • 3
  • L. Dennerstein
    • 1
  1. 1.The Office for Gender and Health, Department of PsychiatryThe University of Melbourne Level 1 NorthMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Psychosomatic MedicineToho UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Pioneer Electronic CorporationSaitamaJapan

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