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Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 48, Issue 9, pp 887–891 | Cite as

Construction of cytopathic PK-15 cell model of classical swine fever virus

  • Haixiang Wu
  • Chuyu Zhang
  • Congyi Zheng
  • Jiafu Wang
  • Zishu Pan
  • Lei Li
  • Shen Cao
  • Guanghui Yi
Reports

Abstract

No cytopathic effect (CPE) can be observed on classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infected cell culture in vitro. This brings an obstacle to the researches on reciprocity between CSFV and host cells. Based on the construction of full-length genomic infectious cDNA clone of Chinese CSFV standard virulent Shimen strain, partial deletion is introduced into genomic cDNA to obtain a 7.5 kb subgenomic cDNA. A new subgenomic CSFV is derived from transfection with the subgenomic cDNA on PK-15 cells pre-infected by CSFV Shimen virus. Typical CPE induced by this subgenomic virus is observed on PK-15 cells. Coexistence of wildtype and subgenomic virus in cytopathic cell culture is demonstrated by RT-PCR detection in cytopathic cells. For conclusion, the construction of cytopathic cell model exploited a new way for researches on the molecular mechanism of CSFV pathogenesis.

Keywords

classical swine fever virus genomic infectious clone subgenome defective interfering particle cytopathic effect 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haixiang Wu
    • 1
  • Chuyu Zhang
    • 1
  • Congyi Zheng
    • 1
  • Jiafu Wang
    • 1
  • Zishu Pan
    • 1
  • Lei Li
    • 1
  • Shen Cao
    • 1
  • Guanghui Yi
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Virology, College of Life SciencesWuhan UniversityWuhanChina

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