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Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 319–325 | Cite as

Pharmacotherapy and blood pressure control in elderly hypertensives in a primary care setting in Bahrain

  • Khalid A. Jassim Al Khaja
  • Reginald P. Sequeira
  • Awatif H. H. Damanhori
Original Articles

Abstract

Background and aims: Antihypertensive treatment in the elderly has important beneficial effects in terms of reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine, in elderly hypertensives, the adherence of primary care physicians to World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHOASH) guidelines for the drug management of hypertension and extent of blood pressure (BP) control. Methods: A multicentric therapeutic audit of medical records of elderly hypertensives was performed in nine primary care health centers in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Results: In elderly hypertensives (≥60 years), the WHQ/ISH-1999 recommended BP targets of <140/<90 mmHg and BP<130/85 mmHg were achieved in 11.1% of elderly hypertensives and 4.1% of elderly diabetic hypertensives, respectively. Antihypertensive combination therapy was used in approximately half of the elderly. No significant difference in BP was found in elderly hypertensives treated either with monotherapy or combination therapy. As regards mono- and overall drug utilization, β-blockers were the most frequently prescribed drugs in hypertensives, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in diabetic hypertensives. Diuretics and calcium channel blockers, the preferred antihypertensives for the elderly, were less often prescribed, particularly in patients with isolated systolic hypertension. Conclusions: Approximately one out of 9 elderly hypertensives and one out of 24 diabetic hypertensives achieved optimal BP control. Although preference for antihypertensives was markedly influenced by comorbidity with diabetes, tailoring of drug therapy was suboptimal and did not adhere to the recommended guidelines in elderly hypertensives. Efforts to improve the drug management of hypertension at primary care level, particularly in the elderly, are required.

Keywords

Antihypertensive therapy BP control clinical guidelines diabetes elderly hypertensives isolated systolic hypertension 

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Copyright information

© Springer Internal Publishing Switzerland 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Khalid A. Jassim Al Khaja
    • 1
  • Reginald P. Sequeira
    • 1
  • Awatif H. H. Damanhori
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and TherapeuticsCollege of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf UniversityManamaKingdom of Bahrain
  2. 2.Ministry of HealthPrimary CareManamaKingdom of Bahrain

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