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The Journal of the Astronautical Sciences

, Volume 57, Issue 3, pp 517–543 | Cite as

Semianalytical Study of Geosynchronous Orbits About a Precessing Oblate Earth Under Lunisolar Gravitation and Tesseral Resonance

  • Sofia Belyanin
  • Pini Gurfil
Article

Abstract

Previous studies of geosynchronous orbits indicated that the equinoctial precession (EP) of the Earth affects the long-term behavior of geosynchronous satellites for missions exceeding ten years. However, these studies did not include the lunisolar gravitation and tesseral resonance. In the present study, a model that includes the latter effects is developed. In particular, it is shown that the EP affects motion in the vicinity of the stable and unstable geostationary points. This effect is pronounced in the vicinity of the unstable points, shifting the satellite away from the geosynchronous altitude. Moreover, it is shown that secular inclination growth on time scales of 10–20 years is induced by the EP. This requires additional stationkeeping maneuvers that may increase the overall fuel usage by about 1%. An additional contribution of the present study is an analysis of EP-perturbed orbits with free inclination drift. An optimal initial node location, minimizing the inclination drift, is calculated while taking into account the effect of the EP. It is shown that the classical optimal initial node locations are changed due to the effect of the EP. A maneuvering program in the presence of EP is developed. It is shown that the timing and number of stationkeeping maneuvers is affected by the EP. The models developed herein utilize non-singular orbital elements.

Keywords

Orbital Element Celestial Mechanics Semimajor Axis Geosynchronous Orbit Correction Maneuver 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Amarican Astronautical Society, Inc 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Aerospace Engineering Technion—Israel Institute of TechnologyHaifaIsrael

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