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Dynamics of β-1,3 Glucanase Activity in Powdery Mildew Resistant and Susceptible Lines of Pea (Pisum sativum L)

  • Sujay Rakshit
  • S. K. Mishra
  • S. K. Dasgupta
  • B. Sharma
Article

Abstract

Powdery mildew infection induced synthesis of β-1,3 glucanase in both resistant and susceptible lines of pea. Increase was most conspicuous and drastic in resistant as compared to susceptible genotypes. Maximum β-1,3 glucanase activity was recorded 6–8 days after spore inoculation. Enzyme activity triggered 10–15 days before visible symptoms were observed. At later stages of crop growth a drop in β-1,3 glucanase activity was recorded which might be one of the possible reasons for reduction in resistance even in resistant genotypes during this period.

Key words

Pisum sativum powdery mildew resistance dynamics β-1,3 glucanase 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sujay Rakshit
    • 1
  • S. K. Mishra
    • 1
  • S. K. Dasgupta
    • 1
  • B. Sharma
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of GeneticsIndian Agricultural Research InstituteNew DelhiIndia

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