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European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 167–169 | Cite as

Disease outcome for children who present with oral manifestations of Crohn’s disease

  • S. Hussey
  • P. Fleming
  • M. Rowland
  • S. Harty
  • L. Chan
  • A. Broderick
  • B. Drumm
  • B. Bourke
Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: At the time of diagnosis of Crohn’s disease there may be oral manifestations. The aim of this study was to describe the outcome for children with oral Crohn’s disease (OCD) at diagnosis, and to determine if there was a difference in the Paediatric Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) scores between those with and those without oral lesions at follow-up. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with OCD who had enrolled in two previous studies were invited to participate. Clinical and laboratory data were collected to calculate the PCDAI. Details of the management of Crohn’s disease were also recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-four of 31 patients participated (77%), of whom 17 were boys (M:F = 2.4:1). Mean age at follow-up was 15.7 years (SD 1.98, range 11.9–19.7 years). Mean duration of follow-up was 55 months (SD 22, range 20–97 months). Oral manifestations were present at follow-up in 7 (29%) of 24 patients. There were no differences between patients with and without OCD at follow-up with regard to medical treatments received or intestinal disease location. There was no difference in median PCDAI scores between those who had and those who had not oral lesions at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: OCD resolved in the majority of children treated for intestinal Crohn’s disease. The occurrence of mouth lesions during follow-up of children who had oral manifestations at initial diagnosis was not a marker for Crohn’s disease activity elsewhere in the intestinal tract.

Key Words

Oral Crohn’s disease Crohn’s disease children dental findings 

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Copyright information

© European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Hussey
    • 1
  • P. Fleming
    • 1
    • 3
  • M. Rowland
    • 2
  • S. Harty
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Chan
    • 2
  • A. Broderick
    • 1
  • B. Drumm
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Bourke
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital CrumlinIreland
  2. 2.UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, The Children’s Research CentreOur Lady’s Children’s HospitalDublinIreland
  3. 3.Trinity College DublinDublin Dental University HospitalDublin 2Ireland
  4. 4.Conway Institute for Biomolecular and Biomedical ResearchUniversity College DublinDublinIreland

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