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JOM

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 27–35 | Cite as

Machining of Titanium Alloys

  • J. F. Kahles
  • M. Field
  • D. Eylon
  • F. H. Froes
Physical & Mechanical Metallurgy

Summary

While machining methods for titanium are basically those practiced for more than twenty years, the development of an extensive machinability database now allows selection of optimum operating conditions for specific machining operations. Care must be exercised to avoid loss of surface integrity, especially during grinding, or a dramatic loss in mechanical behavior such as fatigue can result. To date, techniques such as high-speed machining have not improved the machinability of titanium. A breakthrough appears to require the development of new tool materials.

Keywords

Milling Titanium Alloy Tool Life Surface Integrity Tool Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. Kahles
  • M. Field
  • D. Eylon
  • F. H. Froes

There are no affiliations available

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