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Drug Investigation

, Volume 4, Issue 5, pp 422–434 | Cite as

Open Study of the Clinical Effects of Lansoprazole in the Treatment of Reflux Oesophagitis

  • Toshikazu Sekiguchi
  • Tsutomu Matsuzaki
  • Tsutomu Horikoshi
  • Motoyasu Kusano
Original Research Article

Summary

The clinical efficacy and safety of lansoprazole, administered in a dose of 30mg once daily after breakfast, were studied in an open trial with 38 patients with erosive/ulcerative reflux oesophagitis. In 3 of these patients, the effect on gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastroduodenal motility was also investigated by 24-hour pH and motility monitoring, performed before and 1 week after starting lansoprazole therapy.

Lansoprazole almost completely reduced the total reflux (pH < 4) time and the number of reflux episodes lasting ⩾ 5 minutes, while it did not affect the induction of interdigestive migrating complex. The cumulative disappearance rate of overall subjective and objective symptoms was 66% after 1 week and 91% after 2 weeks. For individual symptoms the disappearance rate for heartburn was 79% after 1 week and 100% after 2 weeks of treatment. An endoscopic healing rate of 76% was achieved after 2 weeks, 97% after 4 weeks, and 97% after 8 weeks of lansoprazole treatment, and in poor responders to histamine H2-receptor antagonist therapy, the healing rate was 83% after 2 weeks and 100% after 4 weeks. Global improvement evaluation, as assessed by endoscopic findings and changes in symptoms and signs, showed ‘marked improvement’ in 94% and ‘moderate improvement’ in 6% of the patients.

In the overall safety evaluation, no problems occurred in 33 (86.8%) of the 38 patients. Three patients had mild cases of dry mouth. No serious abnormal changes in laboratory values were detected. Lansoprazole was deemed to be ‘extremely useful’ in 31 (89%) and ‘considerably useful’ in 3 (9%) of the 35 patients.

These results indicate that lansoprazole, administered in a dose of 30mg once daily after breakfast, inhibits gastro-oesophageal acid reflux almost completely, and it should prove to be a very useful therapeutic agent for reflux oesophagitis.

Keywords

Omeprazole Lansoprazole Famotidine Drug Invest Reflux Oesophagitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshikazu Sekiguchi
    • 1
  • Tsutomu Matsuzaki
    • 1
  • Tsutomu Horikoshi
    • 1
  • Motoyasu Kusano
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of Internal MedicineGunma University School of MedicineMaebashiJapan

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