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Adverse Drug Reactions and Toxicological Reviews

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 157–159 | Cite as

Lamotrigine-Induced Neutropenia Following Two Attempts to Increase Dosage Above 50 mg/day with Recovery Between Episodes

  • Olivier Lambert
  • Gwenaëlle Veyrac
  • Christophe Armand
  • Sandra Bourlon
  • Michel Bourin
  • Pascale Jolliet
Case Report

Lamotrigine is a triazinic compound, chemically different from the other anticonvulsants. It exerts its anticonvulsant effects by blocking voltage-dependent sodium channels and stabilising the neuronal membranes and inhibiting the release of excitory neurotransmitters, mainly the glutamate. Lamotrigine could be associated with haematological effects such as leucopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anaemia, pancytopenia and very rarely aplastic anaemia or agranulocytosis. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman, who presented with neutropenia induced by lamotrigine.

Case Report

Mrs V is 76 years old. Her past medical history consisted of an essential epilepsy since the age of 10 years, iodine and insect bite allergies, gastrooesophageal reflux due to hiatal hernia and, her surgical history involved insertion of left hip prosthesis, carpal tunnel surgery, appendectomy, hysterectomy and sigmoidectomy for diverticular disease. She has been receiving lamotrigine for her epilepsy since...

Keywords

Neutropenia Omeprazole Gabapentin Lamotrigine Phenobarbital 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors have provided no information on sources of funding or on conflicts of interest directly relevant to the content of this report.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivier Lambert
    • 1
  • Gwenaëlle Veyrac
    • 1
  • Christophe Armand
    • 1
  • Sandra Bourlon
    • 1
  • Michel Bourin
    • 1
  • Pascale Jolliet
  1. 1.Centre Régional de PharmacovigilanceInstitut de BiologieNantesFrance

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