JOM

, Volume 45, Issue 4, pp 40–44 | Cite as

Developments in physical chemistry and basic principles

  • H. Y. Sohn
  • W. D. Cho
Review of Extraction & Processing 1993 Review of Extraction & Processing

Keywords

Biosorption Combustion Synthesis Colemanite Japan Inst Alkali Metal Halide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Y. Sohn
    • 1
  • W. D. Cho
    • 1
  1. 1.University of UtahUSA

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