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JOM

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 17–21 | Cite as

Current processes for the cold-wall melting of Titanium

  • James W. Sears
Processing Titanium Overview

Abstract

Conventional vacuum arc consumable electrode melting continues to play a large role in the production of titanium alloy ingots. Titanium melting will be performed by electron-beam and plasma cold-hearth melting in some applications, for the production of titanium rotor-grade ingots. The current reports indicate that hard-alpha defects and high-density inclusions can be eliminated through hearth melting. Automatic controls for electron-beam melting and plasma-arc melting will play an important part in their development for producing high quality titanium ingots. Processes such as cold-wall induction may be integrated into atomization, spray deposition and casting systems. Other combinations of melting techniques can be used for new titanium products in the future.

Keywords

Titanium Alloy Plasma Rotate Electrode Process Plasma Melting Vacuum Metallurgy Titanium Ingot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Sears
    • 1
  1. 1.Retech, Inc.USA

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