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JOM

, Volume 46, Issue 7, pp 24–29 | Cite as

Environmental behavior of beta titanium alloys

  • R. W. Schutz
Titanium Alloy Overview

Abstract

Stemming from their unique combination of elevated strength, low density, and good overall corrosion resistance, beta titanium alloys have become attractive candidate materials for critical, high-stress components in corrosive services. An overview of the comparative corrosion resistance of beta alloys to conventional alpha and alpha/beta titanium alloys in common industrial and aerospace service environments generally reveals attractive behavior depending on the environment and alloy composition and, in some cases, alloy condition. Expanded performance windows are especially noted for the molybdenum-rich beta alloys, particularly with regard to resisting reducing acids, stress corrosion, and high-temperature localized chloride attack, along with hydrogen and oxidation resistance. Where applicable, implications of this enhanced corrosion performance on current and perspective beta alloy applications are also noted.

Keywords

Titanium Alloy Stress Corrosion Crevice Corrosion Beta Titanium Alloy Beta Alloy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. Schutz
    • 1
  1. 1.RMI TitaniumNiles

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