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JOM

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 40–42 | Cite as

Advanced processing technology for high-nitrogen steels

  • John S. Dunning
  • John W. Simmons
  • James C. Rawers
Advanced Processing Applied Technology

Abstract

Both high-and low-pressure processing techniques can be employed to add nitrogen to iron-based alloys at levels in excess of the equilibrium, ambient-pressure solubility limits. High-pressure techniques include high-pressure melting-solidification; powder atomization; and high-pressure, solid-state diffusion. Low-pressure techniques are centrifugal powder atomization and mechanical alloying. This article describes U.S. Bureau of Mines research on a range of processing technologies for nitrogen steels and references thermodynamic and materials characterization studies that have been completed on these materials.

Keywords

Mechanical Alloy Iron Alloy Nitrogen Solubility Metal Nitrides Nitrogen Steel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • John S. Dunning
    • 1
  • John W. Simmons
    • 1
  • James C. Rawers
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Bureau of MinesUSA

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