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Clinical results of acute closing aortic dissection

  • Yukio Obitsu
  • Shin Ishimaru
  • Hiroyuki Ichihashi
  • Taro Shimazaki
  • Satoshi Kawaguchi
  • Mikio Ishikawa
Original Article

Abstract

The therapeutic outocmes of 43 patients with acute closing aortic dissection treated during the past 10 years were evaluated. The patients consisted of 30 men and 13 women with a mean age of 65 ± 9 years. Ten were classified as Stanford type A, and the remaining 33 as type B. During follow-up (6 to 120 months; average 55 months), recanalization and an enlarged ulcer-like projection (ULP) were observed in 5 and 2 type a patients. Although recanalization was not observed in type B patients, enlarged ULP was observed in 10 of them, in 6 of whom developed aneurysm. During the follow-up period, ULP was observed at 30 sites in 26 patients. Monitoring the change in ULP over time showed that the ascending and the proximal descending aorta frequently tended to be enlarged and progressed to aorta frequently tended to be enlarged and progressed to aneurysm. Surgery was performed in 3 patients with recanalization, 5 with enlarged ULP, and 3 with atheroscloerotic aortic aneurysm. Although one patient died of cerebral complications, the other 10 patients showed favorable postsurgical courses. Among 8 patients who died, the actuarial survival rate was favorable, being 96, 91 and 83% at 1, 3 and 5 years. However, the survival rate free from complications related to aortic dissection, defined as rupture, ercanalization, enlarged ULP and aneurysmal change, was 78, 58 and 54% at 1, 3 and 5 years, indicating that aortic dissection-related complications are likely to develop within 3 years. This being the case, conservative therapy may be selected for closing aortic dissection when there are no serious complications in the acute phase. However, closely following patients with diagnostic imaging techniques is essential as there may be complications such as recanalization or enlarged ULP. Such complications should be surgically treated because they may affect long-term prognosis.

Keywords

Aortic Dissection Stent Graft False Lumen Ascending Aorta Actuarial Survival Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Thoracic and Cadiovascular Surgery 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukio Obitsu
    • 1
  • Shin Ishimaru
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Ichihashi
    • 1
  • Taro Shimazaki
    • 1
  • Satoshi Kawaguchi
    • 1
  • Mikio Ishikawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery IITokyo Medical CollegeTokyoJapan

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