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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 91–110 | Cite as

Students’ attitudes to mathematics and performance in limits of functions

  • Kristina Juter
Article

Abstract

The main aim of this article is to discuss the attitudes to mathematics of students taking a basic mathematics course at a Swedish university, and to explore possible links between how well such students manage to solve tasks about limits of functions and their attitudes. Two groups, each of about a hundred students, were investigated using questionnaires, field notes and interviews. From the results presented a connection can be inferred between students’ attitudes to mathematics and their ability to solve limit tasks. Students with positive attitudes perform better in solving limit problems. The educational implications of these findings are also discussed.

Keywords

Positive Attitude Mathematics Education Mathematical Idea Meaningful Learning Concept Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristina Juter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mathematics and ScienceKristianstad University CollegeKristianstadSweden

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