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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 171–186 | Cite as

Making images and noticing properties: The role of graphing software in mathematical generalisation

  • Lyndon Martin
  • Susan Pirie
Articles

Abstract

This paper discusses the growth of mathematical understanding of two students, Graham and Don, as they use a computer graphing program to explore the properties of quadratic equations. Through analysing extracts of video data using the Pirie-Kieren theory, we discuss the ways in which the mathematical understanding of the students grows and how their interactions occasion, facilitate, and restrict this. We consider four ‘clips’ of their mathematical working, highlighting different aspects of their developing understanding, and use of the graphing software. Although we are talking about a computer based graphing package, our conclusions are equally relevant to the use of graphing calculators.

Keywords

Quadratic Equation Interesting Point Program Committee Graphic Calculator Graph Software 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lyndon Martin
    • 1
  • Susan Pirie
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Curriculum StudiesUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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