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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 133–149 | Cite as

Promoting mathematical understanding: Number sense in action

  • Eugene Kaminski
Articles

Abstract

Understanding and use of mathematics can be promoted and assisted by the development of number sense. This paper reports on pre-service primary teacher education students’ involvement in a Number Sense programme that was a component of a mathematics education unit. The results suggest that students develop and utilise multiple relationships among number, attempt to make sense of the mathematics investigated, and provide considered explanations for results achieved.

Keywords

Rational Number Student Teacher Pedagogical Content Knowledge Solution Strategy Number Sense 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene Kaminski
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationAustralian Catholic University McAuleyEverton Park

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