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The development of chance measurement

  • Jane M. Watson
  • Kevin F. Collis
  • Jonathan B. Moritz
Article

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of three questionnaire items which explore students’ understanding of chance measurement in relation to the development of ideas of formal probability. The items were administered to 1014 students in Grades 3,6 and 9 in Tasmanian schools. The analysis, using the NUD•IST text analysis software, was based on the multimodal functioning SOLO model. An analysis of the results and a developmental model for understanding chance measurement are presented, along with implications for curriculum and teaching practice.

Keywords

Australian School Mathematic Education Research Group Australian Education Council Chance Measurement Solo Taxonomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane M. Watson
    • 1
  • Kevin F. Collis
    • 1
  • Jonathan B. Moritz
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of TasmaniaAustralia

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