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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 5–25 | Cite as

Dynamic imagery in children’s representations of number

  • Noel Thomas
  • Joanne Mulligan
Article

Abstract

An exploratory study of77 high ability Grade 5 and 6 children investigated links between their understanding of the numeration system and their representations of the counting sequence 1–100. Analysis of children’s explanations, and pictorial and notational recordings of the numbers 1–100 revealed three dimensions of external representation—pictorial, ikonic, or notational characteristics—thus providing evidence of creative structural development of the number system, and evidence for the static or dynamic nature of the internal representation. Our observations indicated that children used a wide variety of internal images of which about 30% were dynamic internal representations. Children with a high level of understanding of the numeration system showed evidence of both structure and dynamic imagery in their representations.

Keywords

Number System External Representation Numeration System Counting Sequence Numeration Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noel Thomas
    • 1
  • Joanne Mulligan
    • 2
  1. 1.Charles Sturt UniversityAustralia
  2. 2.Macquarie UniversityAustralia

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