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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 101–112 | Cite as

Mathematics teachers in the South African transition

  • Jill Adler
Article

Abstract

This paper describes, analyses and locates policy developments and teacher-related initiatives in mathematics education within the broader educational and policy context of a South Africa in transition. Although the crisis created by years of educational inequality and neglect is immense, these developments go some way towards creating a mathematics education community and resource which could make an impact on the crisis. The teacher focus in the paper arises out of the specific recognition that teacher involvement is the basis of curriculum renewal.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Mathematics Teacher Teacher Development Policy Proposal Curriculum Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill Adler
    • 1
  1. 1.University of the WitwatersrandJohannesburg

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