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International Journal of Steel Structures

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 385–393 | Cite as

Test and numerical simulation of partially encased composite columns subject to axial and cyclic horizontal loads

  • Yiyi Chen
  • Tuo Wang
  • Jing Yang
  • Xianzhong Zhao
Article

Abstract

Partial encased composite (PEC) members with thin steel plates and three types of constructional detailing are studied. Six pieces of PEC column specimens were tested under constant vertical load and cyclic horizontal loads. A numerical FE model is established. In the model, the in-filled concrete is decomposed as transverse and longitudinal springs, considering the functions and the properties of the concrete in two directions. This model simplifies the numerical computation with high efficiency, and acquires a satisfied agreement with test results in both capacity and deformability of the PEC member. The parametrical study by the FE model is performed. By tests and numerical analysis, it is found that though local buckling of thin plate of H steel is a crucial factor, when the compressively axial load does not surpass the encased steel capacity, the PEC could behave quite well under cyclic horizontal loads. No distinguished difference in three kind details was observed, so that PEC member could be built in a simple way.

Keywords

partial encased composite member hysteretic property cyclic test numerical model construction detail 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society of Steel Construction & Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yiyi Chen
    • 1
  • Tuo Wang
    • 2
  • Jing Yang
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xianzhong Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Disaster Reduction in Civil Engineering, Shanghai, ChinaShanghaiChina
  2. 2.School of Civil EngineeringTongji University, Shanghai, ChinaShanghaiChina
  3. 3.North-Western China Architectural Design Institute, Xian, ChinaXi’anChina

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