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Demography

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 1–10 | Cite as

The quality of demographic data for nonwhites

  • Reynolds Farley
Article

Summary

Demographic data for nonwhites in the United States are often assumed to be of low quality. Problems arise because of undercount and underregistration and because individuals included in the census do not always provide accurate information. This paper describes some of the major errors which confound data for nonwhites and attempts to measure the impact that these errors have for various demographic rates.

Keywords

Educational Attainment American Statistical Association Current Population Survey Crude Birth Rate Birth Registration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Resumen

A menudo se supone que los datos demograficos para la población no blanca en Estados Unidos son de baja calidad. Los problemas se originan en la subenumeración y el subregistro y porque los individuos incluídos en el censo no siempre proporcionan una informacibn exacta. Este trabajo describe algunos de los principales errores que complican los datos para la poblaci6n no negra, e intenta medir el impacto que eetos erroree tienen en diversa8 tasas demográficas.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reynolds Farley
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MichiganMichiganUSA

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