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Genes & Genomics

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 227–234 | Cite as

Identification and mapping of a thermo-sensitive genic self-incompatibility gene in maize

  • Xinge Lin
  • Huiling Xie
  • Zhangying Xi
  • Yanmin Hu
  • Guangyuan Zhao
  • Liujing Duan
  • Zongyou Hao
  • Zonghua Liu
  • Jihua Tang
Article

Abstract

In this study, we describe a novel ecological self-incompatibility (SI) line HE97 in maize. The main environmental factors influencing the inbred line characteristics were identified through field sowing trials during a two-year study period (2001 and 2002). The results showed that daily minimum temperature had the greatest effect on floral morphology and breeding system of the SI line. In staminate floret differentiation, when the daily minimum temperature exceeded 24°C, the line exhibited complete self-compatibility; however SI was observed when the daily minimum temperature was below 20°C. Therefore, we characterized the line as exhibiting thermo-sensitive genic self-incompatibility (TGSI). A set of F2 and F2:3 populations, derived from the inbred lines HE97 and Z58, were evaluated for two years to elucidate the TGSI line patterns of inheritance. Classical genetic analyses and QTL mapping results revealed that HE97 self-incompatibility was governed by a single allele, named here astgsi1. Thetgsi1 gene was mapped to chromosome 2 between SSR markers nc131 and bnlg1633, with a distance of 2.40 cM from nc131 and 2.44 cM from bnlg1633.

Key words

maize thermo-sensitive genic self-incompatibility (TGSI) identification gene mapping 

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Copyright information

© The Genetics Society of Korea & Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xinge Lin
    • 1
  • Huiling Xie
    • 2
  • Zhangying Xi
    • 1
  • Yanmin Hu
    • 1
  • Guangyuan Zhao
    • 1
  • Liujing Duan
    • 1
  • Zongyou Hao
    • 3
  • Zonghua Liu
    • 1
  • Jihua Tang
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Agronomy Henan Agricultural University ZhengzhouChina
  2. 2.Biological and Engineering Technology Important Laboratory Henan Agricultural University ZhengzhouChina
  3. 3.Hainan Luchuan Seed Company Ltd.HaikouChina

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