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High performance liquid chromatography and preliminary pharmacokinetics of rufloxacin and its metabolites N-desmethylrufloxacin and rufloxacinsulfoxide in plasma and urine of humans

  • T. B. Vree
  • M. van den Biggelaar-Martea
  • B. P. Imbimbo
Article

Summary

An HPLC analysis was developed for the measurement of rufloxacin and two of its possible metabolites N-desmethylrufloxacin and rufloxacinsulfoxide. Humans are unable to form these two metabolites, while no other metabolites could be detected in the HPLC chromatogram. The half-life of elimination of rufloxacin in two human subjects was 27 and 38 h respectively, while a constant percentage of 25–26% of the dose is excreted unchanged in the urine.

Keywords

HPLC analysis rufloxacin N-desmethylrufloxacin rufloxacinsulfoxide renal excretion rate pharmacokinetics humans 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. B. Vree
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. van den Biggelaar-Martea
    • 1
  • B. P. Imbimbo
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PharmacyAcademic Hospital Nijmegen Sint RadboudGA NijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of AnaesthesiologyAcademic Hospital Nijmegen Sint RadboudGA NijmegenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Clinical ResearchMediolanum FarmaceuticiMilanItaly

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