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Effect of LDL-apheresis on the pharmacokinetics of the lipophilic antilipidemic agent probucol

  • T. Komura
  • K. Takahara
  • M. Sugano
  • A. Fujinishi
  • H. Tasaki
  • Y. Nakashima
  • A. Kuroiwa
Article

Summary

The effect of LDL-apheresis on the pharmacokinetics of antilipidemic agents has not been evaluated thoroughly. In this study, we investigated the effect of LDL-apheresis on the pharmacokinetics of probucol, a lipophilic antilipidemic agent, by studying its distribution and changes in the blood concentration of probucol after LDL-apheresis.

The concentrations of lipoproteins were measured before and after LDL-apheresis in eight patients with familial hypercholesterolemia taking probucol. Concentrations of probucol in the various lipoprotein fractions and plasma were measured by HPLC. The serum concentrations of probucol before and after LDL-apheresis were 39.8±3.3 and 16.5±1.6 μg/ml, and the correlation coefficient between the changes in the serum probucol concentration, and those in the serum cholesterol concentration before and after LDL-apheresis was significant (r=0.73,P<0.01). Changes in the probucol and cholesterol concentrations after LDL-apheresis were mainly found in the LDL fraction. The calculated reductions in the serum contents of probucol and cholesterol were similar to the contents of probucol and cholesterol in the irrigation fluid of the dextran sulfate column. These data suggest that changes of probucol concentration in plasma by LDL-apheresis are mainly due to reductions in the LDL fraction.

Keywords

Apheresis probucol low-density lipoprotein (LDL) 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Komura
    • 1
  • K. Takahara
    • 1
  • M. Sugano
    • 1
  • A. Fujinishi
    • 1
  • H. Tasaki
    • 1
  • Y. Nakashima
    • 1
  • A. Kuroiwa
    • 1
  1. 1.The 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of Occupational and Environmental HealthJapan

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