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Plasma levels and urinary excretion of orally administered propantheline bromide in man

  • C. W. Vose
  • P. M. Stevens
  • N. J. Haskins
  • K. A. Waddell
  • A. J. Hawkins
  • D. A. Rose
  • G. L. Evans
  • R. F. Palmer
  • V. Diaz
  • J. Garza
  • O. Martin
  • H. Rudel
Original Papers

Summary

After a single oral dose of 30 or 60 mg of propantheline bromide peak plasma levels of the drug were reached within 2 h in six healthy men. Mean peak plasma concentrations were 20.6 and 53.1 ng/ml after 30 mg and 60 mg respectively. The mean apparent absorption and elimination half-lives after 30 mg dose were 0.22 and 1.57 h respectively, and similar half-lives were found at the higher dose level. There was a dose related change in plasma levels and AUC of the drug, and some 3% to 4% of the administered dose of propantheline bromide was excreted unchanged in urine at each dose level. Comparison of the plasma levels and urinary excretion of the drug with those seen after i.v. administration in an earlier study indicated an apparently low systemic availability of orally administered propantheline bromide. There was tentative evidence of a qualitative relationship between the oral dose administered, plasma concentrations and the effects of propantheline bromide on salivery excretion.

Key-words

Propantheline man oral pharmacokinetics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. W. Vose
    • 1
  • P. M. Stevens
    • 1
  • N. J. Haskins
    • 1
  • K. A. Waddell
    • 1
  • A. J. Hawkins
    • 1
  • D. A. Rose
    • 1
  • G. L. Evans
    • 1
  • R. F. Palmer
    • 1
  • V. Diaz
    • 2
  • J. Garza
    • 2
  • O. Martin
    • 2
  • H. Rudel
    • 2
  1. 1.G. D. Searle & Co. Ltd.High WycombeEngland
  2. 2.Asociación de Investigación Farmacológica Mexicana A.C.Mexico

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