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Proceedings: Animal Sciences

, Volume 94, Issue 1, pp 57–65 | Cite as

Activity-time budget in blackbuck

  • N L N S Prasad
Article
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

The activity patterns of black buck observed at Mudmal showed that feeding accounted for the maximum frequency (75%) with an average duration of 77 sec followed by standing with a frequency of 62% and an average duration of 19·9 sec. Lying although had only 4% frequency, showed an average duration of over 30 min.

The hourly time budgets for basic activity patterns during the day in a season varied greatly for both females and territorial males. Rhythms of feeding and lying peaks occurred alternately during the day in all seasons. The time budgets for the activity patterns showed seasonal variation. Lying time per day was more than the average time allotted to any activity. In the case of females, the average time spent for feeding per day during summer was 25% which was more than that of monsoon and winter. The time spent in lying was 39% which increased to 48% in monsoon and winter. The average time spent in walking and standing did not show any significant seasonal variation. The time budgets for the territorial males also showed the same tendency as that of the females in all seasons. During winter, however, the feeding time per day was 11% while the lying time was 57%, the former being significantly less and the latter significantly greater than the females.

Keywords

Activity-time budget blackbuck 

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References

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • N L N S Prasad
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyOsmania UniversityHyderabadIndia
  2. 2.Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research InstituteTexas A&I Univ. KingsvilleUSA

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