Advertisement

Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 48, Issue 15, pp 1561–1564 | Cite as

Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis in chicken growth hormone gene and its associations with growth and carcass traits

  • Bingxue Yan
  • Xuemei Deng
  • Jing Fei
  • Xiaoxiang Hu
  • Changxin Wu
  • Ning Li
Reports

Abstract

In this experiment, F2 chicken derived from Broilers crossing to Silky are used to study the effect of growth hormone gene on growth and carcass traits. The partial gene is amplified by two pairs of primers, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) is detected by the technique of PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism), and then confirmed by DNA sequencing. The mutations are found in intron 3 and intron 4 respectively, and can be clarified by digestion withEcoR V andMsp I. The results of least square analysis indicate that the gene has significant association with some carcass traits, such as breast muscle weight, breast muscle rate, abdominal fat rate, and has no association with other growth and carcass traits, such as live weight, carcass weight, eviscerated yield with giblet, eviscerated yield, leg muscle weight, heart weight, liver weight, abdominal fat weight, chest angle width, head and neck weight, shank and claw weight, wing weight, muscular stomach weight, glandular stomach weight, ovary or testicular weight, shank girth, small intestine length, 1-week body weight, 6-week body weight, 12-week body weight, etc. These results demonstrate that GH gene could be a genetic locus or linked to a major gene significantly affecting the growth and carcass traits in chicken.

Keywords

chicken growth hormone gene SNPs breast muscle abdominal fat 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Shaw, E. M., Shoffner, R. N., Foster, D. N. et al., Mapping of the growth hormone gene byin situ hybridization to chicken chromosone, J. of Heredity, 1991(82): 505–508.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Tanaka, M., Hosokawa, Y., Watahiki, M. et al., structure of the chicken growth hormone-encoding gene and its promoter region, Gene, 1992, 112: 235–239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hargis, P. S., Dean, C. E., Hargis, B. M.,In-ovo endocrine manipulation of growth, Crit. Rev. Poultry. Biol., 1993, 3: 307–323.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kuhnlein, U., Ni, L., Weigend, S. et al., DNA Polymorphisms in the chicken growth hormone gene: response to selection of disease resistance and association with egg production, Animal Genetics, 1997, 28: 116–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Liu, H. C., Kung, H. J., Fulton, J. E. et al., Growth hormone interacts with the Marek’s disease virus SORF2 protein and is associated with disease resistance in chicken, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 2001, Jul 31; 98(16): 9203–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Feng, X. P., Kuhnlein, U., Aggrey, S. E. et al., Trait association of genetic markers in the growth hormone and the growth hormone receptor gene in a White Leghorn strain, Poult. Sci., 1997, Dec; 76(12): 1770–5.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Etherton, T. D., Porcine growth hormone: a central metabolic hormone involved in the regulation of adipose tissue growth, Nutrition, 2001, Oct; 17(10): 789–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Hao, Y., Dai, K., Guo, L. et al., Effects of recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) on experimental osteoporotic fracture healing, Chin. J. Traumatol., 2001, May; 4(2): 102–5.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Fotouhi, N., Karazas, C. N., Kuhnlein, U. et al., Identification of growth hormone DAN Polymorphisms which respond to divergent selection for abdominal fat content in chickens, Theor. Appy. Genet., 1993, 85: 931–936.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hodik, V., Mett, A., Halevy, O., Mutual effects of growth hormone and growth factors on avian skeletal muscle satellite cells, Gen. Comp. Endocnnol., 1997, Oct; 108(1): 161–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Vasilatos-Younken, R., Zhou, Y., Wang, X. et al., Altered chicken thyroid hormone metabolism with chronic GH enhancement in vivo: consequences for skeletal muscle growth, J. Endocrinol., 2000, Sep; 166(3): 609–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bingxue Yan
    • 1
  • Xuemei Deng
    • 2
  • Jing Fei
    • 1
  • Xiaoxiang Hu
    • 1
  • Changxin Wu
    • 2
  • Ning Li
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratories of AgrobiotechnologyChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.College of Animal Science and TechnologyChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingChina

Personalised recommendations