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Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 44, Issue 23, pp 2159–2162 | Cite as

Observation of biophoton emission from plants in the process of defense response

  • Xing Da 
  • Tan Shici 
  • Tang Yonghong 
  • He Yonghong 
  • Li Dehong 
Notes
  • 32 Downloads

Abstract

Biophoton emission from germinating soybean under adverse circumstance has been observed by high sensitive imaging system based on ICCD detector. It is found that the intensity of biophoton emission from the injured position of the cotyledon is enhanced obviously compared with the intact position. In addition, a strong biophoton emission has been detected at the tip of the root when the root is supplied with water after drought. The emission induced by wounding may be associated with the defense response of plants. The emission during the process of convalescence after drought may be the results of the changes of oxidative metabolism in cells.

Keywords

ultra-weak luminescence wounding biophoton emission defense response active oxygen 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xing Da 
    • 1
  • Tan Shici 
    • 1
  • Tang Yonghong 
    • 1
  • He Yonghong 
    • 1
  • Li Dehong 
    • 1
  1. 1.Laser Life Science InstituionSouth China Normal UniversityGuangzhouChina

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