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Journal of Visualization

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 197–206 | Cite as

Temperature dependence of intensities of laser-induced fluorescences of ethylbenzene and naphthalene seeded in gas flow at atmospheric pressure

Implications for quantitative visualization of gas temperature
  • Hirasawa T. 
  • Kaneba T. 
  • Kamata Y. 
  • Muraoka K. 
  • Nakamura Y. 
Regular Paper

Abstract

The present study has been carried out with the aim of developing a technique for measuring two-dimensional gas temperature profiles based on two-color fluorescence induced by a one-color laser. The laser sheet of the fourth harmonic (266 nm) from a Nd:YAG laser induced fluorescence in species doped in a nitrogen gas flow. The LIF spectra of seven fluorescent species, namely acetone, methylethylketone, acetaldehyde ethylbenzene, anisole, aniline, and naphthalene, were measured to select the best prospective pair of fluorescent species for this technique. Ethylbenzene and naphthalene show relatively high LIF intensities and their LIF spectra overlap less with each other than with other species. Also, ethylbenzene has a high temperature dependence while naphthalene has a low temperature dependence. Thus by selecting one portion of wavelengths in the range where ethylbenzene or naphthalene is dominant, the temperature of the gas can be determined using the ratio of LIF intensities of the mixture at the two wavelengths with good temperature sensitivity. In addition, a general principle is presented for finding out an optimum pair of wavelengths to obtain a good temperature sensitivity in those LIF spectra.

Keywords

Temperature Measurement Laser Induced Fluorescence Fluorescent Species Temperature Sensitivity Laser Sheet 

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Copyright information

© The Visualization Society of Japan 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hirasawa T. 
    • 1
  • Kaneba T. 
    • 2
  • Kamata Y. 
    • 3
  • Muraoka K. 
    • 1
  • Nakamura Y. 
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Engineering and Center for Advanced MetrologyChubu UniversityAichiJapan
  2. 2.Center for Advanced MetrologyChubu UniversityAichiJapan
  3. 3.Noritake Company LimitedAichiJapan
  4. 4.Division of Mechanical and Space Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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