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Journal of Visualization

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 371–380 | Cite as

Quasi-real time bio—Tissues monitoring using dynamic laser speckle photography

  • Bazylev N. 
  • Fomin N. 
  • Hirano T. 
  • Lavinskaya E. 
  • Mizukaki T. 
  • Nakagawa A. 
  • Rubnikovich S. 
  • Takayama K. 
Article

Absract

Joint development of a laser monitor for the real-time bio-tissue analysis is presented. The monitor is based on the digital dynamic laser speckle photography and deals with soft and hard bio-tissues. In soft tissues, the dynamic bio-speckles are formed in a scattered from a tissue laser light. An optically transparent model of hard bio-tissue was prepared and preliminary analysis of a stress field in the stressed model was performed using the dependence of the refractive index of transparent solids upon the state of stress and the double exposure speckle photography data. The refractive index of the stressed material was evaluated and the state of stress was reconstructed using the stress-optical law.

Keywords

Visualization Bio-tissue monitoring Bio-speckle Blood microcirculation 

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Copyright information

© The Visualization Society of Japan 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bazylev N. 
    • 1
  • Fomin N. 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hirano T. 
    • 3
  • Lavinskaya E. 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mizukaki T. 
    • 2
  • Nakagawa A. 
    • 3
  • Rubnikovich S. 
    • 4
  • Takayama K. 
    • 2
  1. 1.Convective and Wave Processes Laboratory, Heat and Mass Transfer InstituteMinsk Academy of Sciences of BelarusBelarus
  2. 2.Shock Wave Research Center, Institute of Fluid ScienceTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryTohoku University School of MedicineSendaiJapan
  4. 4.Department of OrthopedyBelarusian State Medical UniversityMinskBelarus

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