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East Asia

, Volume 16, Issue 1–2, pp 44–64 | Cite as

Japan and China: Security interests in the post-Cold War era

  • Russell C. M. Ong
Articles
  • 267 Downloads

Abstract

This article examines the role of Japan in relation to China’s security interests in the post-Cold War era. The first section assesses Japan as a potential security threat to China at a time when Japan appears to be re-emerging as a great power. It analyzes the possible rise of nationalism in Japan today, including discussion of China’s dispute with Japan over the Diaoyu Islands. The second section looks at how Japan can actually enhance China’s security interests, particularly in the economic sphere. Japan’s contribution to China’s modernization drive is assessed. It is argued that Japan seems to enhance China’s security interests more than it poses a threat, partly because of the economic benefits China derives from trading with Japan, and partly because Japanese foreign policy has hitherto been kept in check by the U.S.-Japan Mutual Security Treaty.

Keywords

Chinese Communist Party East Asian Study Self Defence Force Beijing Review Security Treaty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell C. M. Ong
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Politicsthe University of Hull

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